Home » Most Famous Synagogues In Mexico

Most Famous Synagogues In Mexico

by danize.com@gmail.com

Mexico is home to a rich and diverse Jewish heritage, with many historic and beautiful synagogues that reflect the cultural and religious diversity of the country. Whether you are Jewish or not, visiting some of these synagogues can be a rewarding and enlightening experience, as you can learn more about the history, architecture, and traditions of the Jewish community in Mexico. In this Travel Guide, we will introduce you to some of the most famous synagogues in Mexico that you should not miss if you are planning to explore this aspect of mexican culture.

  1. Nidjei Israel Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Nidjei Israel): This is a historical synagogue that was built in 1941 and is located at Justo Sierra 71. It has a Moorish style and a dome that can be seen from afar. The synagogue was restored in 2008 and is now a cultural center that hosts concerts, exhibitions and lectures.
  2. Yehuda Halevi Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Yehuda Halevi): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was founded in 1930 by immigrants from Aleppo, Syria. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 600 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a choir that sings in Arabic, Hebrew and Spanish.
  3. Agudas Ajim Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Agudas Ajim): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was established in 1926 by immigrants from Poland, Lithuania and Russia. It is located at Montes de Oca 32 and has a capacity for 300 people. The synagogue has an Ashkenazi rite and a library that contains books in Yiddish, Hebrew and Spanish.
  4. Adat Israel Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Adat Israel): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was founded in 1938 by immigrants from Turkey, Greece and Rhodes. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 500 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a museum that displays objects and documents related to the history of the community.
  5. Monte Sinai Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Monte Sinai): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was created in 1942 by immigrants from Damascus, Syria. It is located at Tennyson 134 and has a capacity for 800 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a school that offers education from kindergarten to high school.
  6. Rodfei Tzedek Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Rodfei Tzedek): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was established in 1948 by immigrants from Iraq, Iran and Kurdistan. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 400 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a social hall that hosts events and celebrations.
  7. Beth Moshe Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Beth Moshe): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was founded in 1952 by immigrants from Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 300 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a youth group that organizes activities and trips.
  8. Shar le Simja Synagogue in Huixquilucan (Sinagoga Shar le Simja): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was created in 1998 by members of the Monte Sinai community who moved to the suburbs. It is located at Fuente de la Huerta 22 and has a capacity for 250 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a kindergarten that provides early childhood education.
  9. Beth Yosef Synagogue in Huixquilucan (Sinagoga Beth Yosef): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was established in 2004 by members of the Beth Moshe community who moved to the suburbs. It is located at Fuente de la Huerta 22 and has a capacity for 200 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a mikvah that follows the highest standards of kashrut.
  10. Hoel Yitzjak Synagogue in Huixquilucan (Sinagoga Hoel Yitzjak): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was founded in 2006 by members of the Rodfei Tzedek community who moved to the suburbs. It is located at Fuente de Templanza 13 and has a capacity for 150 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a playground that offers recreational facilities for children.
  11. Beth Yitzjak Synagogue in Huixquilucan (Sinagoga Beth Yitzjak): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was created in 2008 by members of the Adat Israel community who moved to the suburbs. It is located at Fuente de Templanza 13 and has a capacity for 100 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a study hall that provides Torah classes and lectures.
  12. Or Joseph Synagogue in Huixquilucan (Sinagoga Or Joseph): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was established in 2010 by members of the Yehuda Halevi community who moved to the suburbs. It is located at Fuente de Templanza 13 and has a capacity for 50 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a kitchen that serves kosher meals and snacks.
  13. Habitat Synagogue in Huixquilucan (Sinagoga Habitat): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was founded in 2012 by members of the Nidjei Israel community who moved to the suburbs. It is located at Fuente de Templanza 13 and has a capacity for 25 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a garden that grows organic vegetables and herbs.
  14. Maguén David Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Maguén David): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was created in 1962 by immigrants from Aleppo, Syria. It is located at Lafontaine 229 and has a capacity for 1000 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a dome that resembles the one of the Great Synagogue of Aleppo.
  15. Aram Zoba Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Aram Zoba): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was established in 1964 by immigrants from Damascus, Syria. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 600 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a mural that depicts the history of the Jewish people.
  16. Maor Abraham Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Maor Abraham): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was founded in 1966 by immigrants from Baghdad, Iraq. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 500 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a stained glass window that shows the symbols of the twelve tribes of Israel.
  17. Maor Hatora Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Maor Hatora): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was created in 1968 by immigrants from Tehran, Iran. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 400 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a chandelier that illuminates the sanctuary with colorful lights.
  18. Keter Tora Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Keter Tora): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was established in 1970 by immigrants from Istanbul, Turkey. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 300 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a marble ark that contains several Torah scrolls.
  19. Birkat Shmuel Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Birkat Shmuel): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was founded in 1972 by immigrants from Rhodes, Greece. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 200 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a mosaic that represents the Star of David.
  20. Ramat Shalom Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Ramat Shalom): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was created in 1974 by immigrants from Casablanca, Morocco. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 100 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a fountain that symbolizes the source of life.
  21. Shaarei Tzion Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Shaarei Tzion): This is an Orthodox synagogue that was established in 1976 by immigrants from Cairo, Egypt. It is located at Avenida Cuauhtémoc 223 and has a capacity for 50 people. The synagogue has a Sephardic rite and a menorah that stands at the entrance of the building.
  22. Bet El Synagogue in Mexico City (Sinagoga Bet El): This is a Conservative synagogue located in the Lomas de Chapultepec neighborhood. It was founded in 1954 by a group of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe who wanted to practice Judaism in a more modern and egalitarian way. The synagogue has a large sanctuary, a social hall, a library, a mikvah, and a school. It is affiliated with the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism and the Masorti movement.

We hope this Mexico Travel Guide has given you some useful information and inspiration for your trip planning. Don’t forget to follow us on social media and share the most beautiful Synagogues in Mexico with your friends and family.

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