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Things To Do In Cordoba – Best Tourist Attractions In Cordoba

by danize.com@gmail.com

If you are looking for things to do in Cordoba, you will not be disappointed. This city in southern Spain has a rich history and culture that can be explored through its many attractions. Whether you are interested in ancient monuments, beautiful gardens, or lively festivals, you will find something to suit your taste in Cordoba. In this article, we will introduce you to some of the best tourist attractions in Cordoba that you should not miss on your visit. From the stunning Mosque-Cathedral to the charming Jewish Quarter, these are the things to do in Cordoba that will make your trip unforgettable.

Looking for things to do in Cordoba? Discover the best tourist attractions in Cordoba:

1. Mosque-Cathedral: A stunning hybrid of Islamic and Christian architecture, built over centuries.
2. Medina Azahara: The ruins of a 10th-century palace-city that was once the capital of Al-Andalus.
3. Roman Temple: The remains of a 1st-century temple dedicated to Emperor Claudius, discovered in the 1950s.
4. Roman Bridge: A picturesque bridge over the Guadalquivir river, dating back to the 1st century BC.
5. Torre de Calahorra: A 14th-century tower that houses a museum of Islamic culture and history.
6. Puerta del Puente: A monumental gate that marks the entrance to the historic center of Córdoba.
7. Tapas Bars: The best way to sample the local cuisine and enjoy the lively atmosphere of Córdoba.
8. Patios and Courtyards: The charming and colorful spaces that adorn many houses and buildings in Córdoba, especially during the annual festival in May.
9. Palacio de Viana: A 14th-century palace with 12 beautiful gardens and a rich collection of art and furniture.
10. Calleja de las Flores: A narrow alley filled with flowers and plants, offering a postcard view of the Mosque-Cathedral.
11. Alcázar de los Reyes Cristianos: A 14th-century fortress that was the residence of Ferdinand and Isabella, with impressive gardens and fountains.
12. Jewish Quarter: The old neighborhood where the Jewish community lived until their expulsion in 1492, with narrow streets and white-washed houses.
13. Synagogue: One of the only three surviving medieval synagogues in Spain, built in 1315 in Mudejar style.
14. Plaza de la Corredera: A large and lively square that was once used for bullfights and public executions, now a popular spot for cafes and markets.
15. Plaza del Potro: A charming square with a fountain and a statue of a foal, mentioned by Cervantes in Don Quixote.
16. Museo Julio Romero de Torres: A museum dedicated to the famous painter from Córdoba, known for his portraits of women and Andalusian themes.
17. Museo de Bellas Artes: A museum of fine arts housed in a former hospital, with works by local artists from the 14th to the 20th century.
18. Caballerizas Reales: The royal stables that were built by Philip II in 1570, where you can see a show of Andalusian horses.
19. Iglesia de San Pablo: A 13th-century church that was part of a convent, with a Gothic facade and a Baroque interior.
20. Iglesia de San Andrés: A 13th-century church that was rebuilt in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and a rococo altarpiece.
21. Iglesia de San Lorenzo: A 13th-century church that was renovated in the 17th century, with a Gothic-Mudejar tower and a Baroque nave.
22. Iglesia de San Miguel: A 13th-century church that was restored in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and a neoclassical facade.
23. Iglesia de Santa Marina: A 13th-century church that was remodeled in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and a Baroque portal.
24. Iglesia de San Nicolás de la Villa: A 13th-century church that was refurbished in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and an ornate dome.
25. Iglesia de San Pedro: A 13th-century church that was reconstructed in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and a Baroque main altar.
26. Iglesia de la Magdalena: A 13th-century church that was modified in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and an elaborate dome.
27. Iglesia del Salvador y Santo Domingo de Silos: A 13th-century church that was transformed in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and an impressive facade.
28. Iglesia del Juramento de San Rafael: A 17th-century church that was built on the site where the archangel Raphael appeared to protect Córdoba from the plague.
29. Iglesia de la Compañía: A 17th-century church that was founded by the Jesuits, with a Baroque facade and a richly decorated interior.
30. Iglesia de San Agustín: A 14th-century church that was enlarged in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and a neoclassical portal.
31. Iglesia de San Francisco y San Eulogio: A 13th-century church that was expanded in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and a Baroque chapel.
32. Iglesia de la Trinidad: A 14th-century church that was renovated in the 18th century, with a Mudejar tower and a neoclassical facade.
33. Iglesia de Santa Ana: A 15th-century church that was restored in the 18th century, with a Gothic-Mudejar tower and a Baroque interior.
34. Iglesia de San Cayetano: A 18th-century church that was built by the Theatine order, with a neoclassical facade and a dome covered with tiles.
35. Iglesia de la Merced: A 18th-century church that was erected by the Mercedarian order, with a neoclassical facade and a rococo interior.
36. Iglesia de San José y Espíritu Santo: A 18th-century church that was constructed by the Carmelite order, with a neoclassical facade and a dome decorated with frescoes.
37. Iglesia de San Pablo y San Álvaro: A 18th-century church that was founded by the Discalced Carmelite order, with a neoclassical facade and an oval dome.
38. Iglesia del Carmen: A 18th-century church that was built by the Carmelite order, with a neoclassical facade and an octagonal dome.
39. Iglesia de Santa Victoria: A 18th-century church that was erected by the Franciscan order, with a neoclassical facade and an elliptical dome.
40. Iglesia del Sagrado Corazón de Jesús: A 19th-century church that was raised by the Jesuit order, with a neogothic facade and a pointed dome.

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